Eurypterus  remipes

 

The eurypterids, or sea scorpions, are an extinct group of chelicerate arthropods.  They have an elongated, scorpion-like body that could reach enormous sizes (2.5  to 3 meters!), with a nonmineralizing exoskeleton composed of chitinous material.  They are generally found in shallow to very shallow water marine and marginal marine facies.

 

Eurypterus remipes DeKay, 1825 is a classic example of this bizarre group of creatures.  It, and other eurypterid species, is well represented in the famous Bertie Dolomite of New York State, USA.

 

Classification: Animalia, Arthropoda, Chelicerata, Merostomata, Xiphosura, Eurypterida, Eurypteridae

 

Stratigraphy: Phelps Member, Fiddlers Green Formation, Bertie Dolomite Group, Upper Silurian.

 

Locality: Allan Lang Quarry, southern Herkimer County, New York State, USA.

 

 

http://www1.newark.ohio-state.edu/Professional/OSU/Faculty/jstjohn/Cool%20Fossils/Eurypterid1.jpg

Eurypterus remipes DeKay, 1825 partial specimen (11.7 cm long) in fine-grained dolostone, lacking preabdomen and most of postabdomen.

 


 

http://www1.newark.ohio-state.edu/Professional/OSU/Faculty/jstjohn/Cool%20Fossils/Eurypterid-head.jpg

Eurypterus remipes DeKay, 1825 - closeup of head (prosoma) showing four walking appendages (labeled below) and swimming appendages with paddles at distal ends (7.5 cm across).

http://www1.newark.ohio-state.edu/Professional/OSU/Faculty/jstjohn/Cool%20Fossils/_derived/Eurypterus-remipes.htm_txt_Eurypterid-head.gif

 


 

http://www1.newark.ohio-state.edu/Professional/OSU/Faculty/jstjohn/Cool%20Fossils/Head-appendage.jpg

Eurypterus remipes DeKay, 1825 - closeup of 3rd walking appendage on specimen shown above (1.15 cm long).

 


 

http://www1.newark.ohio-state.edu/Professional/OSU/Faculty/jstjohn/Cool%20Fossils/Eurypterid2.jpg

Eurypterus remipes DeKay, 1825 partial specimen (12.5 cm long) in fine-grained dolostone, lacking paddles (distal ends of swimming appendages), pretelson & telson (posterior end of the body).  The last four segments are part of the postabdomen.  The seven segments anterior to that make up the preabdomen.

 


 

 

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